Saloons

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The center of activity for most visitors, cowboys, drifters and adventurers in the New West is the saloon. These range from simple drinking establishments, gambling casinos, dance halls, nightclubs, restaurant, hotel or combinations of each. They may be relatively bright, cheerful and safe places for people to meet, drink, eat and have fun. Others are dangerous places that attract ruffians, drifters, smugglers, drug dealers, thieves, gunslingers, prostitutes and men of low character. These saloons are as varied as the guests they serve.

THE CARNIVAL SALOON
This is the center of activity in Penance, and is typical of many large saloons found throughout the West. It is a large building at the center of town, with the following services:

Drinks- all kinds
Food and Dining area- specializes in steak and breakfast all day long
Entertainment- There is a stage in the back hall, with a long runway that extends into the seating area. There are no blood sport pits, but everything else can be found here.
Room & Board: 30 credits a night unless there is an important entertainer in town
Gambling: A professional gaming room with tables and dealers
Soiled Doves: Six girls work for the Carnival, with the most infamous being Mary Palmer- nicknamed Mary-go-round.

THE DUSTY ALE
This is a den of ill repute, with a notoriously bad reputation. While the Dusty Ale is in the town of Penance, there are many like it throughout the West.

Drinks- Cheap drinks only, and still questionable quality. You have to be infamous to get the good stuff.
Gambling- There are three private game rooms, but they are invitation only. There is very little room to sit in the main area outside of the long bar.

MUD CREEK TAVERN
This is a small saloon that caters to the D-Bee population of Penance County and other travelers. Despite the stigma of being a haven for D-Bees, it’s a surprisingly nice saloon.

Drinks- All but rare drinks are available
Food & Dining- There is a small hall with a half dozen tables. The food is good quality, with some exotic tastes catering to non-humans that frequent the area.
Gambling- There are two rooms for gambling, open to any who wish to join as long as space is available in the games.

>>> Typical Saloon Services <<<

SERVICES (not all are available at all saloons)
Drinks:
Beer and Bourbon are the two most popular drinks, but many serve wine, whiskey or other homemade brews such as Redeye (popular in the Nebraska Territory). Others include Skull Bender, Gut Rot, Snake Bite and more.
One might also be able to purchase Elixirs like Rheumatism Medicine, Cough Medicine, Pain Killer, Sleeping Elixir or The Cure. The actual healing properties of these are questionable, although some effective remedies can be found. These Elixirs can also be obtained from traveling medicine shows.

Costs:
1-2 credits for a glass or shot of low quality
3-6 credits for the good stuff
1-2 credits for a bottle of beer or equivalent
5-8 credits for a cheap bottle of whiskey, moonshine, or rum
10-20 credits for a bottle of good quality bourbon, whiskey, rum or other liquor
1-2 credits a glass or bottle for nonalcoholic beverages

Food:
Typically purchased as meals

Costs:
2-4 credits for pancakes and sausage or bacon
3-6 credits for 3-4 eggs with bacon or ham
1-2 credits for a Bowl of beans or rice
3-5 credits for a Bowl of stew
7-10 credits for a Steak dinner

Dining:
Many saloons just have a bar, or serve food without offering a place to dine. Those that do have the space can be a welcome respite from the daily life in the West.

Entertainment:
Usually a stage with a piano or organ. Chairs are possible, but usually they are moved so patrons can dance and crowd around to see the spectacle. Most have speakers and microphones. The entertainment might be bands, dancers, actors, singers, burlesque, acrobats or comedians.

Costs:
Usually free to attract customers, but a cover charge of 2-5 credits is not uncommon
More famous performers can cost up to 10-50 credits per person.

Gambling:
Usually these are offered in separate rooms, with specialty gaming tables and typically house dealers. There may also be private rooms available for important guests. Others might have a pit for cock fighting or wrestling as well out back.

Room & Board:
Small rooms usually offer a bed, bath (often outside of the room), and breakfast for the price of a night’s stay. Costs vary dramatically, but saloons are usually 20-30% cheaper than the local hotels, and much less safe.

Costs:
20-60 credits per night

Soiled Doves:
This is the typical name for western women of the night. Most saloons who engage in this trade will take a cut of the profits. These women range from poor vagabonds to Saloon girls who have learned to manage the risks and enjoy rich rewards.

Costs:
20 credits is standard, but Saloon girls have been known to charge far more.

Saloons

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